Tree of Life And Other Klimt Classics

The Tree of Life gives us a contemporary and uplifting image from Gustav Klimt which previously was used by Celtic artists for it’s symbolic message. Whilst several religions still use it for the purposes of artistically representing life and health, most people now link the Tree of life with the exceptional work of the Austrian painter whose work came around the end of the 19th and start of the 20th century.

This article will outline the qualities of this fine painting Tree of Life and also point out others from Klimt’s career which may also be of interest to you. With so much interest in this artist in the modern era, it seemed essential to provide more information on both his life and also this particular painting which provides so much enjoyment to so many, all across the world.

You will find creative detail with an abstract form which was unusual at that time. Branches twist into perfect shapes which equally cover the large canvas and upon much of the trunk is extra detail which shows how the artist would go to great lengths to consider each and every element of his painting. You will see the same kind of detail in the background of other paintings that he produced such as The Kiss, which itself is also highly respected and loved by academics and mainstream art fans alike. Many of the colour choices are also the same in both paintings.

Those looking to learn more about other paintings from Gustav Klimt should check out The Kiss as well as Mother and Child plus also several portraits including Adele Bloch-Bauer. This artist had several preferred models which he built up over time and would constantly return to them on regular occasions.

We can summarise by stating that the artist took his existing approach of bold colours and contemporary portraits and then used the symbolic power of the Tree of life which itself came from religious history. This combination created something elaborate and powerful which even occasional art fans in the modern day will instantly recognise and pinpoint as part of the Austrian’s work.